Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea

Green and Golden Bell Frog

Litoria aurea

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Other Names: Ranoidea aurea, green bell frog, green and golden swamp frog, green frog.

Family: Pelodryadidae, Genus Litoria (Australasian tree frogs) which has 93 species, and usually several new species identified every year.

Size: 7-11 cm. It can reach up to 11 cm (4.5 in) in length, making it one of Australia's largest frogs.

Distribution: Formerly distributed in a strip a few hundred kilometres from the southeast coast of Australia, from the north of NSW to east Gippsland in Victoria. Now only found in a small number of isolated locations.

Status: Endangered in NSW, vulnerable nationally and globally. Though once one of the most common frogs in south-east Australia, the green and golden bell frog has endured major population declines, particularly in highland areas. As most of the remaining populations live on private land, the logistics of the conservation effort can be complicated. Despite the situation in Australia, some frog populations have survived with more success in New Zealand and several other Pacific islands, where it has been introduced. However, even in these areas the population of green and golden bell has been rapidly declining in the past few decades.

Habitat: Swamps, ponds, dams, other still water. Likes reedy plants. Many populations, particularly in the Sydney region, inhabit areas of infrequent disturbance, such as golf courses, disused industrial land, brick pits, and landfill areas.

References: Clulow and Swan, Wikipedia.

About the Green and Golden Bell Frog

The Green and Golden Bell Frog is a ground-dwelling "tree frog" native to eastern Australia. Despite its classification (as a tree frog) and climbing abilities, it does not live in trees. It spends almost all of its time close to ground level.

Diet: Green and Golden Bell Frogs are voracious eaters of insects, but will also eat larger prey, such as worms and mice. The frogs can engage in cannibalism, and males frequently attack and injure one another if they infringe on one another's space.

Breeding: Breed in the warmer months, spring and summer. Males reach maturity after around 9 months, while for the larger females, this does not occur until they are two years old. Eggs are laid in floating clusters which then sink.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW. High Resolution 3024 x 2012.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW. High Resolution 2500 x 1667.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW. High Resolution 2880 x 1920.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW. High Resolution 3024 x 2012.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW. High Resolution 2784 x 1848.

Green and Golden Bell Frog - Litoria aurea
Photo taken at Wild Life Sydney Zoo, NSW. High Resolution 2500 x 2053.

See Also

Australian Mammals
Australian Birds
Australian Reptiles
Australian Fish
Australian Spiders and Their Faces
Australian Wild Plant Foods

Return to Australian Frogs
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